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Finally Finished


I posted this painting before when I thought it was done, but I looked at it with a friend one day and he made some good points. If you look at the before photo you will see that the petals in the middle of the flower bleed   together,  you can’t tell where one ends and another  begins unless you look closely at the brush stroks. So I mixed up a nice dark reddish purple to fix that problem, and I did feel it was a big problem. Then I sat there staring at it and it told me it was still unfinished. A thought came to me out of the blue, photographs , the subject in focus and behind it out of focus. So I played with this idea, I’m not sure how it turned out but the painting finally feels finished. So take a good look at the before and after and let me know what you think, if you want.



Artist of the day 2/27/12: Graffiti 6: Lady Pink


Sorry for not posting an artist of the day yesterday everyone. It terned out to be a very hectic day. But I am very happy to say I hit a record yesterday, 99 views for one day! Thank you to all my readers!

Lady Pink

Lady Pink’s birth name is Sandra Fabara. She was born 1964 in Ambato, Ecuador, and raised in Queens, New York.

She started her graffiti career in 1979 after the loss of a boyfriend who had been sent to live in Porto Rico after he was arrested. She worked through her grief by tagging his name all over the city. Soon after she started to use the name Lady Pink. The name was inspired by her love of historical romances, England, the Victorian period, and the aristocracy. She studied at the High School of Art & Design in Manhattan. While attending the school she was introduced to graffiti. This was when she was 15, when she lost her boyfriend, and started tagging.
Within a few years she began running with TC5 (The Cool 5) and TPA (The Public Animals) crews. She was soon well known as the only female capable of competing with the boys in the graffiti world.

Lady Pink painted subway trains from 1979 through 1985. In 1980, at only 16 years old she was included in the landmark New York show “GAS: Graffiti Art Succes” at Fashion Moda, which traveled in a modified form downtown to The New Museum of Contemporary Art.

Young, approachable, quick-witted, and one of the only female graffiti writers, Lady Pink became among the most photographed and interviewed graffiti artist of her time.

In 1983, 19 years old, she appeared in theaters in the starring role in Charlie Ahearn’s fill Wild Style as Rose. That same year she worked on a series of large scale paintings with artist Jenny Holzer, The two have since collaborated many times.

So while she was still in high school she was already exhibiting paintings in art galleries, by twenty-one she mounted her first solo show “femmes-Fetales” at the Moore College of Art & Design in Philadelphia.

After 1987 she took a hiatus from painting outdoors, but she returned in 1993 after meeting her future husband, fellow graffiti legend SMITH, with whom she collaborates on murals and commercial work.

Lady Pink’s studio paintings often incorporate images of New York subways weaving and winding through decaying, POP-surrealist cityscapes. They have been widely exhibited throughout the United States and abroad.

Lady Pink is one of the leading participants in the rise of graffiti-based art. Her canvases have entered important art collections such as those of the Whitney Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Groningen Museum of Holland. She has established herself in the fine art world, her paintings highly prized by collectors.

Today she continues to create new paintings on canvas that express her unique vision. She also shares her 30 years of knowledge and experience by holding mural workshops with teens and actively lecturing college students throughout the northeast.

Lady Pink’s website

Her work

Artist of the day 2/25/12: graffiti 5: Banksy



Banksy has his hands in many artistic treasures as a pseudonymous England-based graffiti artist, political activist, film director, and painter. His artistic works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world.

According to the author and graphic designer Tristan Manco and the book Home Sweet Home, Banksy “was born 1974 and raised in Bristol, England. The son of a photocopier technician, he trained as a butcher but became involved in graffiti during the great Bristol aerosol boom of the late 1980s.”

Banksy is known for his contempt for the government in labeling graffiti as vandalism, as such he displays his art on public surfaces such as walls and even going so far as to build physical prop pieces.

Banksy does not sell photos of his street graffiti directly himself. However, art auctioneers have been known to attempt to sell his street art on location and leave the problem of its removal in the hands of the winning bidder.

Banksy’s first film Exit through the gift shop, billed as “The world’s first street art disaster movie” made its debut at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival. The film was released in the UK on march 5, 2010. In January 2011, he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Documentary for the film. Now who said “The world’s first street art disaster movie”? I think its safe to say they where wrong.
From Banksy’s page :

Frequently asked questions

Is it cheating to use stencils?
Stencils are good for two reasons;
One – they’re quick ; two – they annoy idiots.

Why are you such a sell out?
I wish I had a pound for every time someone asked me that.

Is Banksy just a big brand these days? Do you even paint your own pictures?
It’s not supposed to be a brand, which is why people in advertising think it’s such a good one. I paint it all myself unless its illegal, in which case I’ve never seen any of it before, your honour.

Is Exit Through the Gift Shop real?

Are you still friends with Mr. Brainwash?
I like to think so. When I asked him what he thought about the film he said “This is a cult movie, this is a classic movie, this movie stands alone – like The Godfather.”

Did you paint over Robbo’s piece and have him beaten up?
His piece in Camden had been dogged for more than five years by the time I painted that spot. It’s a real shame about his accident and I hope he fully recovers. I would never deliberately cuss Robbo – he’s a graffiti legend.
And he’s bigger than me. Click Here

Did you rip off Blek le Rat?
No, I copied 3D from Massive Attack. He can actually draw.

Do you need an intern?
No thanks.

Why are you so annoying?
It’s not all my fault, sometimes they make it up – I’ve never vandalized a war memorial, painted Kate Moss’s kitchen or visited the Playboy club with Ashley Cole wearing a skull mask.

What artists do you rate?
Käthe Kollwitz is my favourite. Partly because her drawing style is so beautiful, and partly because she thought being an artist was self-indulgent crap and became a doctor in an orphanage instead.

Can you donate a picture for my charity auction?
What are you? Blind? In which case maybe. I mostly support projects working to restore sight and prevent eye disease. Or as I like to call it ‘expanding the market’.


Please don’t follow me on facebook or twitter because I’m not on there.

Some of His work

I love this one

A lot of Banksy’s fans have gotten tattoos of his work 🙂
link to an article about this photo go check it out, its a good one. About people petitioning to keep his work up in a town where graffiti has been outlawed

Artist of the day 2/24/12: Graffiti 4: Xenz


Graeme Brusby AKA Xenz

Brusby was born in 1974. He became a graffiti artist at the age of 14, inspired by films and books documenting the sub culture of New York. He developed the tag “sense” which evolved into what he does today – Xenz (pronounced “zenz”)

Brusby practiced graffiti art for 20 years, developing a unique approach to the well known art form.

If I may say so. He has beautiful work with true depth, color, and invoking feeling. He is now one of my favorite graffiti artist I have seen.

(origin of quote unknown) He has said and I must agree “I paint stuff that floats and stuff that flies, on a mission to capture the ethereal vision behind my eyes”

His early paintings where inside the derelict warehouses of Hull in Yorkshire England. This encouraged a very experimental approach to graffiti, to the point that the simple word graffiti no longer sufficiently describes what he does.

His imagination shows through in the landscapes he paints, using a spray can to capture fragments of memory and ever changing subjects, often drawn from the natural world and enhanced in his eye.

He lived in Bristol where he painted many pieces alongside one of the UK’s longest standing and most respected graffiti crews TCF( twentieth century frescos), He was one of three in the group, and artists such as Banksy, Inkie and Massive Attack’s 3D.

Quote from his web site (about TCF) “I painted with two friends called Eko and Paris, we were known as “The TCF Crew”( twentieth century frescos). If we had a vision we painted it, we did the wackiest stuff possible and really tried to be unique. We expanded our influences and started exploring different styles of painting even sculpture and printing, we always pushed each other’s ideas as far as possible being critical and particular about ideas and aesthetics sat in a small bedroom in the cold North Eastern part of England in a city called Hull.”

Xenz has been shown in exhibitions and art fairs in the UK, Miami, New York, Basel, Ibiza and Sydney. He has had sell-out London solo shows, and his limited edition prints are in huge demand. His work is in private and corporate collections worldwide. He studied at Edinburgh College of Art. He lives and works in London.

Solo Exhibitions

2011 – “Cloud Cuckoo Land” , December 1- 4, 2011, Blackall Studios, 73 Leonard Street, Shoreditch, London, England

2011 – “Pecking Disorder” , Lazarides, Outsiders, Newcastle upon Tyne, England

2010 – “Birds Butterflies and spraycans” , Wk exp, New Delhi, India

2010 – “These flowers grow wild” , La Hora Azul, Santa Gertudis, Ibiza, Spain

2010 – “Wonderlust” , Bicker gallery, Sydney, Australia Sidney Morning Herald

2009 – “Unforscenery” , Forster Gallery, London

2007 – “The Law Of Attraction” , Forster Gallery, London

2007 – “For The Love”, Workshop Gallery, Bristol

2006 – “Big City of Dreams”, This way up gallery, London

2002 – E Shed, Bristol, Uk

1999 – Avant Graff, Chicane, Bristol

Group Exhibitions and events

Urban in Ibiza – Atzaro Ibiza
Ghosts of gone birds – Liverpool school of art and design

Rise of the non conformists, Whitecross street, London

Flying Eyeball, Gallery 24 Mayfair London
Friend & co Bristol
Bristollisboa gallery, Lisbon,
Tunnel 228, Waterloo, London
Meeting of styles, London

Visual Street Performance, Barrio Alto, Lisbon
Artists 11, Truman Brewery, London
Big Chill, Festival
Glastonbury, Festival

The Bad Note, Dragon Bar, London
One in ten, Forster Gallery, London.
Lattitude Festival
Write for Gold, London

One the Seventh Day, Pimp Magazine, London

Natural Selection, British Graffiti Alsopp Contemporary, London
Meeting of styles, Padova ,Italy

Meeting of styles, wintertur ,switzerland

Meeting of styles, Pori , Finland

Attitude festival, Montpellier France,

What’s in a Name, Retrospective of Hull’s Graffiti Scene, Quay Art, Hull
Walls on Fire, Bristol

By Any Means, Wasps Gallery, Edinburgh
His web page is a must see if you find his work as butiful and inspiering as I do!

Some of Xenz’s Work

Artist of the day 2/23/12: Graffiti 3: Jules Muck


Artist Jules Muck

Muck was born in England, and raised in New York. She started doing graffiti in Europe and Great Britain. In the 90’s she began bombing in New York, where she was discovered by Lady Pink. Lady Pink took her under her wing as an apprentice for the next four years.

Muck has been published in Ganz’s Graffiti Woman, Cey Adam’s Definitions and both of the Murrays books Burning New York and Broken Windows. After moving to LA she added her first name Jules to the Equation. She has shown at Lab Art Gallery and the Rivera Beach area, where she lives and has a studio.

Jules Muck lives to paint and paints to live, every day, for life.

probably about 75% of the photos I found for work is green. I think it is safe to say she really likes green. But that is only my conclusion, I could be wrong. 🙂

Muck was Quoted saying in an interview with Ark Collective “I never planned to be an artist. I was actually not into art at all as a teenager, but I did do graffiti. Most of the time I used to go out and try to wreck murals and stuff, and put my name everywhere. Slowly, by doing it over and over again, my name got more and more intricate. Over time, this woman who is an artist in the Bronx took me on as her apprentice. I just did it because I wasn’t thinking, and I kind of became her right hand man. She showed me how to make money as an artist and make a living that way. Basically she gave me the confidence to do it since I never thought it was a possibility, and it worked out really well.”

muck certainly has come a long way since her teens. she has shown at the Bronx Museum of the Arts, Fuse Gallery in New York, the Pacific Design Center in LA, the Stephen Cohen Gallery, and all over the streets. No big deal as she pumps out 1-6 paintings a day. “All I do is paint. Everything else has fallen by the wayside. I used to write, I used to read, I used to try and play music but now I just obsess over the painting 24/7.” says Muck.

Muck’s work

Artist of the day 2/22/12: Graffiti 2: Frank Shepard Fairey


Frank Shepard Fairey AKA OBEY

Early Life

Fairey was born February 15, 1970 in Charleston, South Carolina. His father Strait Fairey is a doctor, And his mother Charlotte a realtor. Fairey started his involvement in art in 1984 when he he started applying his drawings on skateboards and T-shirts. In 1988 he graduated from Idyllwild Arts Academy. In 1992 he graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in illustration.


In the summer of 2009 Fairey had his first art museum exhibition, aptly named Supply & Demand in Boston at the Institute of Contemporary Art. The exhibition featured over 250 works in a wide variety of media: screen prints, stencils, stickers, rubylith illustrations, collages, and works on wood, metal and canvas. As a complement to the ICA exhibition, Fairey created public art works around Boston. The artist explains his driving motivation: “The real message behind most of my work is ‘question everything.”

Fairey sits on the advisory board of Reaching to Embrace the Arts, a not-for-profit organization that provides art supplies to disadvantaged schools and students. In May 2006, Fairey became a board member of the Music Is Revolution Foundation, a not-for-profit organization that supports music education for students in public schools. Fairey resides in Los Angeles with his wife Amanda and daughters Vivienne and Madeline.

Fairey created the “André the Giant Has a Posse” sticker campaign in 1989, while attending the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). This later evolved into the “Obey Giant” campaign, which has grown via an international network of collaborators replicating Fairey’s original designs.[13] As with most street artists, the Obey Giant was intended to inspire curiosity and cause the masses to question their relationship with their surroundings.

The Obey Giant website says: “The sticker has no meaning but exists only to cause people to react, to contemplate and search for meaning in the sticker.” The website later goes on to contradict this statement however by saying that those who are familiar with the sticker simply find humor and enjoyment from its presence. Those who actually try to look deeper into its meaning only burden themselves and often end up condemning the art as an act of vandalism from an evil, underground cult.

Originally intended to garner fame amongst his classmates and college peers, Fairey states “At first I was only thinking about the response from my clique of art school and skateboard friends. The fact that a larger segment of the public would not only notice, but investigate, the unexplained appearance of the stickers was something I had not contemplated. When I started to see reactions and consider the sociological forces at work surrounding the use of public space and the insertion of a very eye-catching but ambiguous image, I began to think there was the potential to create a phenomenon.”

In a manifesto he wrote in 1990, and since posted on his website, he links his work with Heidegger’s concept of phenomenology. His “Obey” Campaign draws from the John Carpenter movie “They Live” which starred pro wrestler Roddy Piper, taking a number of its slogans, including the “Obey” slogan, as well as the “This is Your God” slogan. Fairey has also spun off the OBEY clothing line from the original sticker campaign.[citation needed] He also uses the slogan “The Medium is the Message” borrowed from Marshall McLuhan. Shepard Fairey has also stated in an interview that part of his work is inspired by other street artists.

After graduation, he founded a small printing business in Providence, Rhode Island, called Alternate Graphics, specializing in t-shirt and sticker silkscreens, which afforded Fairey the ability to continue pursuing his own artwork. While residing in Providence in 1994, Fairey met American filmmaker Helen Stickler, who had also attended RISD and graduated with a film degree. The following spring, Stickler completed a short documentary film about Shepard and his work, titled “Andre the Giant has a Posse”. The film premiered in the 1995 New York Underground Film Festival, and went on to play at the 1997 Sundance Film Festival. It has been seen in more than 70 festivals and museums internationally.

Fairey was a founding partner, along with Dave Kinsey and Phillip DeWolff, of the design studio BLK/MRKT Inc. from 1997–2003, which specialised in guerilla marketing, and “the development of high-impact marketing campaigns”. Clients included Pepsi, Hasbro and Netscape (for whom Fairey designed the red dinosaur version of’s logo and mascot).

OBEY Giant clothing sold at a Nordstrom department store
In 2003 he founded the Studio Number One design agency with his wife Amanda Fairey. The agency produced the cover work for The Black Eyed Peas’ album Monkey Business and the poster for the film Walk the Line. Fairey has also designed the covers for The Smashing Pumpkins’ album Zeitgeist, Flogging Molly’s CD/DVD Whiskey on a Sunday, the Led Zeppelin compilation Mothership and Anthrax’s The Greater Of Two Evils.

In 2004, Fairey joined artists Robbie Conal and Mear One to create a series of “anti-war, anti-Bush” posters for a street art campaign called “Be the Revolution” for the art collective “Post Gen”. “Be the Revolution” kicked off with a night of performances featuring Z-Trip, Ozomatli and David J at the Avalon in Hollywood. Fairey also co-founded Swindle Magazine along with Roger Gastman.

In 2005 he collaborated for a second time with Z-Trip on a limited edition 12-inch featuring Chuck D entitled “Shock and Awe.” In 2005 Fairey also collaborated with DJ Shadow on a box set, with t-shirts, stickers, prints, and a mix CD by Shadow. In 2005 he showed abroad, for instance in Paris at the Galerie Magda Danysz. In 2005 also, he was a resident artist at the Contemporary Museum, Honolulu. Also in 2005 Fairey contributed the artwork for the posters, cover art, and graphics for the biopic of Johnny Cash, Walk The Line. In 2006, Fairey contributed eight vinyl etchings to a limited-edition series of 12″ singles by post-punk band Mission of Burma, and has also done work for the musical group Interpol.

The book Supply and Demand: The Art of Shepard Fairey was released in 2006. In 2008, Philosophy of Obey (Obey Giant): The Formative Years (1989–2008), edited by Sarah Jaye Williams, was published by Nerve Books UK, and praised by Fairey.

Fairey working with Hawaii-themed art at an official installation at the Makiki, Honolulu Skate Park
In June 2007, Fairey opened his one man show entitled “E Pluribus Venom”, at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery. The show made the arts section front page in The New York Times.

Fairey donated original cover art to the 2008 album Body of War: Songs That Inspired an Iraq War Veteran, produced for Iraq War documentary Body of War. Proceeds from the album benefit non-profit organization Iraq Veterans Against the War.

In 2008 Fairey teamed up again with Z-Trip to do a series of shows in support of then presidential candidate Barack Obama entitled Party For Change. Fairey also designed posters for the British goth band Bauhaus.

In September 2008, Shepard opened his solo show titled “Duality of Humanity” at The Shooting Gallery in San Francisco. His third solo show with the gallery featured one hundred and fifty works, including the largest collection of canvases pieces in one show that he’s done.

Fairey was arrested on February 7, 2009, on his way to the premiere of his show at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, Massachusetts, on two outstanding warrants related to graffiti. He was charged with damage to property for having postered two Boston area locations with graffiti, a Boston Police Department spokesman said. His arrest was announced to party goers by longtime friend Z-Trip who had been performing at the ICA premiere at Shepard Fairey’s request.

On April 27, 2009, Fairey put three signed copies of his Obama inauguration posters up on eBay, with the proceeds of the auction going to the One Love For Chi foundation, founded by the family of Deftones bassist Chi Cheng following a car accident in November 2008 that nearly claimed Cheng’s life.

Lance Armstrong rode a Trek Madone styled by Fairey in the 2009 Giro d’Italia, starting on May 9, 2009 in Venice, Italy.

In addition to his successful graphic design career, Fairey also DJs at many clubs under the name DJ Diabetic and Emcee Insulin, as he has diabetes.

In 2011 Time Magazine commissioned Fairey to design its cover to honor “The Protester” as Person of the Year in the wake of the Arab Spring, Occupy Wall Street and other social movements around the world. This was Fairey’s second Person of the Year cover for Time, his first being of Barack Obama in 2008.

(As ushual my info comes from Wikipedia today, but today most of the wording comes from them. I siply didn’t have the time today to write it all in my own words. Sorry all!)


Keith Haring Canvas Screen Print by Shepard Fairey

Hillcrest Mural, 2010

Artist of the day 2/21/12: Graffiti 2: SABER


Simply SABER

The Artist

Graffiti is a widespread form of art and fast becoming a recognized in the art community. If you ask me it should have always bin that way! I know for a large part graffiti has been used by gangs, that could be why it wasn’t recognized before. But the way some individuals have chosen to look at it is better, the world is there canvas. What they create is intricate, moving, aw inspiring, and some of the most beautiful work out there.

Saber is one of thousands of people who make up the graffiti community around the world. Few names carry the same legendary Quality as Saber. The Washington Post described him as one of “the best and most respected artists” in his field.

Saber was born in 1976 in the Los Angeles suburb of Glendale. He was raised by creative parents, discovering his passion for art at an early age. When he was 13 his cousins introduced him graffiti when they took him to see the spray paint-covered Belmont Tunnel. That single moment changed his life, he was hooked. He honed his skills on local walls, he joined MSK, and was later inducted into legendary piecing crew AWR.

Saber was already a fixture in Los Angeles graffiti scene by 1997 when he completed the largest graffiti piece ever created. His piece on the sloping cement bank of the Los Angeles River was nearly the size of a professional football field, it took him 35 nights to complete and 97 gallons of paint. The piece catapulted Saber to legend status in the graffiti world.

In 2002 Saber began exhibiting his fine art. His monograph, SABER: MAD SOCIETY, complete with stories of his graffiti misadventures, was released by Gingko Press in 2007 and is now in its second printing. In October 2010, SABER released a video in which the year’s heated debate about health care was spray painted over the American flag. While some saw it as desecration, Saber advocated for health care reform in the video, revealing that he had epilepsy and was uninsurable. This work led Saber to create a large group of American flag paintings called the Tarnished series. I have added a photo of this installation.

In 2011, Saber’s solo show, The American Graffiti Artist opened in New York to great acclaim. Additionally, his art was featured in two museum exhibitions, Street Cred at the Pasadena Museum of California Art and MoCA Los Angeles’s blockbuster Art in the Streets.

View his web page with Bio (where I got most of my information), gallery and lots more at

SABER’s work